Sports

Republicans and Democrats have similar goals. They will make different arguments.

If there is one thing Republicans and Democrats can agree on, it’s that the internet giants have become too powerful and need to be restrained. Many lawmakers also agree that the companies should be stripped of a law that shields websites from liability for content created by their users.But members of the Senate commerce committee will almost certainly make wildly different arguments to drive home their points on Wednesday.Republicans regularly accuse Facebook, Google and Twitter of censoring conservative viewpoints by labeling, taking down and minimizing the reach of posts by Republican politicians and right-leaning media personalities. They have the support of President Trump, who issued an executive order this summer aimed at stripping the technology companies of their safe harbor u...

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Big Tech’s chief executives are becoming regulars on Capitol Hill.

It used to be unusual to see a top tech executive face tough questioning before lawmakers on Capitol Hill. But that has changed in the past few years. Now, the chief executives of Facebook, Google and Twitter are old hands at Congressional hearings.The hearing on Wednesday will be the fifth time Mark Zuckerberg of Facebook has testified before lawmakers; the third time for Sundar Pichai of Google; and the third for Jack Dorsey of Twitter. All of the appearances have taken place in the past three years.The hearings have been a boon to law firms in Washington that prepare the chief executives. WilmerHale has been on Facebook’s retainer for years, for example, and has now prepped Mr. Zuckerberg for all hearings since his first in March 2018. Source link ...

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Facebook, Google and Twitter C.E.O.s return to Washington to defend their content moderation.

For more than two decades, internet companies have been shielded from liability for much of what their users post by a once-obscure rule called Section 230 of the Communications Decency Act. Now that shield — and how internet companies moderate content on their sites — is being questioned by lawmakers on both sides of the political aisle.On Wednesday, the chief executives of Google, Facebook and Twitter will testify before a Senate committee about their moderation practices.The hearing, held by the Senate Committee on Commerce, Science and Transportation, will be a repeat performance before Congress for Sundar Pichai of Google, Mark Zuckerberg of Facebook and Jack Dorsey of Twitter. But with the Nov. 3 election less than a week away, the executives face additional pressure to manage mis...

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Republicans Blast Social Media C.E.O.s While Democrats Deride Hearing

WASHINGTON — Lawmakers hammered the chief executives of Twitter, Facebook, Google and one another at a Senate hearing on Wednesday, with Republicans claiming the companies were suppressing conservative views while Democrats accused their colleagues of holding a “sham” hearing for political gain.For nearly four hours, members of the Commerce Committee pelted Twitter’s Jack Dorsey, Facebook’s Mark Zuckerberg and Google’s Sundar Pichai with more than 120 questions about social media speech and the harm caused by their platforms, often framing their attacks through the lens of next week’s election.But unlike previous tech hearings, this one put the partisan divide on full display. Republicans attacked Twitter and Facebook for what they said was censorship of posts by conservative politician...

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Zuckerberg, Dorsey and Pichai Head Back to Washington: Live Updates

Here’s what you need to know:Sundar Pichai, Google’s chief executive, speaking via video at a House Judiciary subcommittee hearing in July.Credit...Pool photo by Graeme JenningsFor more than two decades, internet companies have been shielded from liability for much of what their users post by a once-obscure rule called Section 230 of the Communications Decency Act. Now that shield — and how internet companies moderate content on their sites — is being questioned by lawmakers on both sides of the political aisle.On Wednesday, the chief executives of Google, Facebook and Twitter will testify before a Senate committee about their moderation practices.The hearing, held by the Senate Committee on Commerce, Science and Transportation, will be a repeat performance before Congress for Sundar Pi...

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Sports

Trump Campaign Website Is Defaced by Hackers

President Trump’s campaign website was briefly taken over by hackers who defaced the site on Tuesday.The defacement lasted less than 30 minutes, but the incident came as Mr. Trump’s campaign and that of his opponent, Joseph R. Biden Jr., as well as law enforcement and intelligence agencies, have been on high alert for digital interference ahead of next week’s election.In a statement, Tim Murtaugh, a spokesman for the Trump campaign, confirmed the website’s defacement and said it was “working with law enforcement authorities to investigate the source of the attack.” He added, “There was no exposure to sensitive data because none of it is actually stored on the site. The website has been restored.”The F.B.I. did not immediately comment on the incident. The defacement was first noted on Tw...

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The Year in Misinformation, So Far

This has been, by any measure, a bad year for consensus reality.First, there was President Trump’s impeachment — a divisive and emotionally charged proceeding that unleashed a torrent of lies, exaggerations and viral innuendo.Then came the Covid-19 pandemic — an even bigger opportunity for cranks, conspiracy theorists and wishful thinkers to divide us along epistemic lines, into those who believed the experts and those who preferred to “do their own research.”The Black Lives Matter protests this summer were a feeding frenzy for those looking to distort and reframe the narrative about police violence and racial justice.And while election years are always busy times for fact-checkers, Mr. Trump’s fusillade of falsehoods about voter fraud, Spygate and Hunter Biden’s emails this year has re...

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Jon Stewart Returns to Spotlight With a Series for Apple TV+

After five years out of the TV spotlight, Jon Stewart will have his own show again.The former anchor of “The Daily Show” has reached a deal to host a current affairs series for Apple TV+, the company announced on Tuesday.Apple TV+ said it had ordered the series for multiple seasons. It will feature one-hour episodes, each dedicated to a single topic. Apple did not describe the format — whether it would be an interview series or something closer to John Oliver’s weekly HBO series — or specify how many episodes it would have per season. Apple did not set a premiere date, either.But Apple did say that Mr. Stewart’s new show “will explore topics that are currently part of the national conversation and his advocacy work.” Mr. Stewart has been outspoken about the September 11th Victim Compens...

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Don’t Even Try Paying Cash in China

This article is part of the On Tech newsletter. You can sign up here to receive it weekdays.It’s hard for those of us who live outside of China to grasp how paying for everything has gone digital in the country.Most businesses there, from the fanciest hotels to roadside fruit stands, display a QR code — a type of bar code — that people scan with a smartphone camera to pay with China’s dominant digital payment apps, Alipay and WeChat. Paying by app is so much the norm that taxi drivers might curse at you for handing them cash.My colleague Ray Zhong, who used to live in Beijing and wrote about Alipay’s parent company selling stock to the public for the first time, spoke with me about how China’s digital payment apps created new kinds of commerce, and whether China offers a glimpse at a ca...

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Twitter to Highlight Accurate Voting Information

Twitter’s emphasis on up-to-the-second posts has made the site a must-visit destination for people to find the latest in news and current events. It has also made Twitter a vessel for the spread of false information.To stem that tide, Twitter on Monday announced a new effort to preemptively debunk, or “prebunk” in Twitter parlance, some of the most commonly circulated false and misleading information about the election.The company will, for the first time, pin information to the top of users’ timelines about how to vote, as well as a notice that voting results may not come immediately on Election Day — two common topics for misinformation across social media.“We believe it’s critical that we make it easy for people to find that information,” said Nick Pacilio, a Twitter spokesman. “Thes...

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